Hey, Instagram, Bring Back the Goddess

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boundandgaggedbooks:

Let’s talk censorship. Here’s my take on Instagram’s ban on the Goddess hashtag and why it is not okay on so many levels. #BringBackTheGoddess

Originally posted on salt and iron:

As you may or may not have heard, Instagram has banned the hashtag #Goddess. While this move was allegedly to cut down on explicit content posted under the hashtag, Instagram has inadvertently stepped onto a landmine of sexism, ethnocentrism, religious discrimination, and censorship. Instagram previously tried to ban the hashtag #Curvy for the same reason and reversed the decision after the backlash they faced. Somehow, nobody at Instagram thought that “Goddess”, an arguably way more loaded term than “Curvy”, would have the same issue.

Yet issue there was. Immediately upon noticing the ban, myself and others took to Instagram and other social media platforms to protest. Hashtags like #Goddess, #BringBackTheGoddess, #BringBackGoddess, #GoddessTribe, #GoddessRising, and others took off on both Instagram and Twitter, some with thousands of posts already. There is also a Change.org petition to reverse Instagram’s ban on #Goddess. Articles about the ban can be found on The Mary Sue, The Daily…

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Routineology: Mythmaking, music, and minimized YouTube clips

boundandgaggedbooks:

More news from the other blog. I’ve been featured on Black Hill Press’s Routineology project, which offers readers a glimpse into the creative process and writing routine of authors.

Originally posted on salt and iron:

2015-06-16 08.18.23This week I was featured on Black Hill Press’s Routineology, which offers glimpses into the writing processes and routine of various authors. If you want to know the method behind my madness or see that adorable Okapi Squishable’s reading list of awesome myth, folk, and fairytale books in a much more legible list format, you can read my Routineology here.

If you’re being noncommittal about clicking the link, here’s a snippet to peak your curiosity:

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Need a Summer Getaway? Try Blair Mountain

boundandgaggedbooks:

So, I know I’ve been terrible at posting to this blog and I really do intend to remedy that, but, in the meantime, I am keeping up with my other blog, Salt and Iron. Also, I’m happy to say that you can read my fiction for free all summer as a part of JukePop and Black Hill Press’s Summer Writing Project. So if Urban Fantasy, Horror, American history, Irish fairy lore, labor movements, immigration, and Appalachia are things that interest you, consider this your lucky day.

Originally posted on salt and iron:

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Great news! I’m participating in the Summer Writing Project, a collaboration between JukePop, which is revitalizing the serial, and Black Hill Press, which publishes the long-neglected shortform that is the novella. What does this mean? Well, it means that you can read my novella, Beneath Blair Mountain, as I update it serially all summer.

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Why Children’s Books Matter

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boundandgaggedbooks:

I wrote this on my personal blog, but, while I’m not aware of Animorphs being banned (though it would not surprise me), this seemed to fit with many of the things I have said on this blog, as children’s books and YA are so frequently banned, often because adults do not think kids can handle mature or complex themes.

Originally posted on salt and iron:

This is me and a friend with K. A. Applegate, author of the Animorphs series. Animorphs, Harry Potter, the Julie of the Wolves books, and Harriet the Spy are what made me want to be a writer. So, when K. A. Applegate was scheduled to appear at my local bookstore, my friend and I knew we had to go. What struck me most about actually meeting one of my favorite authors from childhood in the flesh was how she was so encouraging of the kids who liked writing or wanted to be writers and so excited to see her older readers, saying Animorphs fans grew up to be the coolest people. When K. A. Applegate was asking a little girl if she was a writer and encouraging her to be one, I couldn’t help but think how much that would have meant to me as a kid.

K. A. Applegate and…

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Poetry Circle: The Troll that Shakes the Barley

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boundandgaggedbooks:

Instead of talking about minority languages or outlawed languages as I usually do for St. Patrick’s Day, I give you a poem. Happy St. Paddy’s Day!

Originally posted on salt and iron:

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! In keeping with my last post about soda bread, here’s a poem that seemed fitting to share on such a holiday as this. This poem began quite randomly. A box of barley went missing in the apartment. Poof. Gone. I searched everywhere to no avail. As no one had eaten it and it’s not like someone would break in just to steal half a box of barley, I jokingly blamed the trolls. I’m a mythology major, I do that.

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More Shameless Self-Promotion

Just like the title says, it’s time for more shameless self-promotion of my work, this time poetry (wouldn’t Braggi be proud). Two of my poems were featured in digital magazine Fabulously Feminist (which some of you may recognize from the Blogroll). I also talk ancient epics, the role of women in religion/mythology, and what inspires my work, so go check it out here. Feel free to poke around while you’re there and see what other awesome stuff Fabulously Feminist does.

More of my poetry and other non-banned-book thoughts can be found on my personal blog, Salt & Iron, which focuses largely on writing, myth/folk musings, and personal anecdotes about living with invisible/chronic illness. You can also find a list of all of all of the places to find me and my work on the internet here.

Fireworks, Merrymaking, and a Hobbit or Two

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 7,300 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 6 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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