Tag Archive | challenged books

Banned Books Week 2015

Hey, all. It’s that time of year again. Banned Books Week! Earlier this month I was interviewed about Banned Books Week and banned books in general by the good folks at Fabulously Feminist. It’s a pretty in-depth interview and Callie asked great questions, so go check it out. If you don’t feel like hanging on my every word, feel free to scroll down and read the list of ways you, yes you, can get involved with Banned Books Week. Read More…

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A Swiftly Derailing Story

The HP set were mine to inherit, the Time Quartet paperbacks were not. Please enjoy this Shannonless cover.

The HP set were mine to inherit, the Time Quartet paperbacks were not. Please enjoy this Shannonless cover.

Hi, folks. So, I was almost done with this review, but then when I went back to finish it, all of my work from the day before had vanished, despite me saving it multiple times. Alack the day! So, here is my second attempt at writing this thing. I blame the Echthroi. They clearly don’t want me remembering what “Might Have Been Written”.

THE DEFENDANT: A Swiftly Tilting Planet, Madeleine L’Engle Read More…

Freedom to Read

Happy Independence Day! Please enjoy this lovely historical reenactment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZfRaWAtBVg&feature=youtu.be

America has a complicated relationship with banned books and intellectual freedom. It seems we are caught in an endless tug of war between independent thinkers and those afraid of independent thinkers (continuing the themes discussed in last week’s A Wrinkle in Time review).

Thus, I wish you all a happy day of BBQs and fireworks and hope you’ll consider picking up Common Sense (actually read it, unlike the members of a certain political party) or “Action Comics #1” (Superman beating up abusive husbands and exposing the corporate greed behind war, what’s not to love?) or any number of books we’ve discussed on this blog for a glimpse into America’s long history of censorship and controversial ideas.

“Let us welcome controversial books and controversial authors.”

– President John F. Kennedy

A Wrinkle in Our Moral Fabric

Wrinkle

Wrinkle3

THE DEFENDANT: A Wrinkle in Time, Madeleine L’Engle

THE VERDICT: A Wrinkle in Time came in at #23 on the ALA’s 100 Most Frequently Challenged Books from 1990-1999 and #90 from 2000-2009. The award-winning classic has been the subject of numerous challenges, attracted the attention of various groups taking issue with the material, and nearly wasn’t published.

Read More…

But the Tigers Come at Night

TigerTHE DEFENDANT: Tiger Eyes, Judy Blume

THE VERDICT: Tiger Eyes itself, censored even before publication, has received its share of challenges, coming in at #89 on the ALA’s Most Frequently Challenged Books of 1990 to 1999. However, Tiger Eyes is but one jewel in the crown of the Empress of YA herself, Judy Blume. Though beloved by generations of fans (including Amy Poehler and John Green), Judy Blume has long been a lightning rod for censorship and controversy.

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Dandelion Wine

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I can’t find the original source for this to give it credit. Thank you, unknown internet anti-censorship crusader.

So, as you may or may not know, Ray Bradbury died exactly one year ago today. In addition to being a personal hero of mine, Bradbury is intimately associated with banned books, both because of his many works that have been banned and the themes of his perennial classic, Fahrenheit 451. Taking Fahrenheit 451 out of my local library was a day that changed my life, as no book has ever made me so afraid. Clarisse’s death and the woman who went up in flames with her books rather than live without them had a particular impact on my teenage self. Read More…

A Perfect World

My humblest thanks, dear readers. Your enthusiasm and patronage made last month my best month ever, just two views shy of 900. Your response to the anonymous account of Anime Boston was swift and staggering. I thank you all for reading and sharing my good Samaritan’s story. Perhaps if we all called out sexual harassment, slutshaming, and victim blaming when we saw it, there would be less stories like Susie’s.

Without further ado, here’s my review of the film adaptation of The Lovely Bones. You can read my review of the book here.

REPEAT OFFENDER: The Lovely Bones (2009) Read More…