Tag Archive | CBLDF

Banned Books Week 2015

Hey, all. It’s that time of year again. Banned Books Week! Earlier this month I was interviewed about Banned Books Week and banned books in general by the good folks at Fabulously Feminist. It’s a pretty in-depth interview and Callie asked great questions, so go check it out. If you don’t feel like hanging on my every word, feel free to scroll down and read the list of ways you, yes you, can get involved with Banned Books Week. Read More…

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Stickin’ It to the Ban

Greetings readers, new and old. I’d like to thank you all for dropping in on us and getting involved in Banned Books Week, to whatever extent and in whatever way you did. BBW is a yearly event, not just to celebrate banned and challenged books and the freedom to read, but to draw attention to the fact that, yes, this is still happening. Here. In the US. In your state. In our schools and libraries and sometimes our legislatures. Read More…

Batgirls, Boy Wonders, and Beyond: A Parent’s Saga

Though often thought of as the domain of kids, many comics these days are written and marketed to adults. As I’ve said before on the blog, assuming a genre or medium is automatically kid-friendly or mindless fluff is where many parents go wrong. It’s also how many things that expect a level of maturity of their young readers, or were never intended for young readers to begin with, get banned. Or how you end up like that mom who accidentally bought her son a pornographic pop-up book because she assumed Game of Thrones was like Narnia.

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BANNED BOOKS WEEK: GRAPHIC CONTENT

Today marks the first day of Banned Books Week, an annual event meant to draw attention to book challenges/removals/bans and other censorship or intellectual freedom issues. This year the event, which runs from September 21-27, will focus specifically on comic books/graphic novels. I’ve already written extensively about the unique history and issues involved in comic book censorship on this blog, so I thought I’d offer a round-up of the highlights, as well as Banned Books Week resources and ideas on how you can get involved. It’s also frequently challenged horror author Stephen King’s birthday today, so let’s hear it for banned horror, banned comics, and the twice-damned banned horror comics! Long may ye remain in our libraries. Read More…

Free Comic Book Day

Don’t have plans yet this weekend? Saturday, May 3rd is Free Comic Book Day, a day dedicated to comics, encouraging comic book readership, and getting the next generation of fans and readers involved. For more information, check out the official Free Comic Book Day website. Many comic book retailers have special events planned, so check out what’s going on at your local store. If you don’t have a friendly neighborhood comic book store you frequent, you can use the store locator to find one. Last week marked the 60th anniversary of the US Senate putting comic books on trial, a case that would lead to the Comics Code Authority and the near collapse of the industry, so what better time to get back in the comic book store and reclaim your freedom to read.

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

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THE DEFENDANT: Pride of Baghdad, Brian K. Vaughan and Niko Henrichon, Vertigo

THE VERDICT: According to the American Library Association, the Huffington Post, and the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, Pride of Baghdad is one of the most frequently challenged graphic novels. Considering the long history of censorship, moral panic, and mistrust/misconception surrounding the medium, that’s quite a feat.

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Comics, Classrooms, and Caricatures

Good afternoon, friends. I came across this article from the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund and thought I’d pass it along. It discusses how graphic novels can be used as educational tools, taking a specific look at the graphic novel American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang.

http://cbldf.org/2013/07/using-graphic-novels-in-education-american-born-chinese/

American Born Chinese uses racial stereotypes as one way of addressing discrimination and identity in America. While the book is not banned, some consider this inappropriate. Given that I have not read it, I cannot say how race and racial stereotypes are handled. Thus, I was wondering what you, my lovely readers, thought about it.

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