Read It Yourself

Hello, readers! In addition to today being FridayReads, it’s also the 30th anniversary of Reading Rainbow! Yes, you really are that old. In addition to some serious nostalgia, Reading Rainbow’s anniversary is a great time to reflect on literacy, lifelong readership, and passing a love of books and knowledge onto the next generation (who will one day be in charge, so, even if you don’t have kids, education and literacy should matter to you).

As summer approaches, it provides an excellent opportunity to get kids reading, thinking, and exploring their world. Whether your child is still being read to, just starting to tackle chapter books, or can tear through an 870 page Harry Potter book in a single sitting, encouraging and engaging with their reading is a wonderful gift to give a child that will reap rewards for the rest of their life.

To help you in your quest, I refer you to your local library, reruns of Wishbone (You can find most of them on YouTube since PBS has yet to release them on DVD. Get on it, PBS!), and this summer reading list compiled by the National Teacher of the Year.

http://www.takepart.com/photos/kids-summer-reading-ideas

While some obvious classics have been left out and it seems a little light on female leads, this list provides suggestions for a variety of ages and reading levels, as well as some tips on how to make reading both a priority and a passion. If you have any suggestions on good summer reading, whether for younglings or veteran bibliophiles, feel free to share them.

If you want a good pool read that still has substance, I highly recommend Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume. My review of the book just went up (movie review to follow), so, as LeVar Burton would say, don’t take my word for it; read it yourself.

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About boundandgaggedbooks

Shannon is a freelance writer and folklore buff. She has a degree from Hampshire College in Creative Writing/Mythology & Religion, with an emphasis on epic/oral traditions, their anthropological implications, and their modern counterparts. Her work can be found in Fabulously Feminist, Wolf Wariors: The National Wolfwatcher Coalition Anthology, The Concord Monitor, Redhead Magazine, and The Climax.

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