Save Wolves, Read An Awesome Book

boundandgaggedbooks:

We interrupt your regularly scheduled programming to bring you shameless self-promotion. The anthology I’m in is out! Huzzah! Er, awwwoooooo?

Originally posted on salt and iron:

WolfWarriors

Cover design by Matt Cowan and Marshall Stevens. Wolf Warriors copyright Thurston Howl Publications.

Great news, internet! The anthology I’m in is out! Wolf Warriors: The National Wolfwatcher Coalition Anthology is a wolf-themed charity anthology to raise money for the National Wolfwatcher Coalition, which seeks to educate people about wolves and their importance, as well as advocating for their preservation. The anthology is chock-full of lupine art, fiction, flashfiction, and essays of all genres, so fantasy fans, nature/animal lovers, literary folks, non-fiction people, art enthusiasts, and all manner of readers can all find something to enjoy.

The anthology also features stories by David Clement-Davies (author of The Sight, Fell, and Fire Bringer) and two-time Hugo Award winner Catherynne M. Valente (author of the Fairyland series)! I’m super stoked to be in an anthology with them and can’t wait til my copy arrives so I can read “Fell’s Dream” and “The…

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Stickin’ It to the Ban

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Greetings readers, new and old. I’d like to thank you all for dropping in on us and getting involved in Banned Books Week, to whatever extent and in whatever way you did. BBW is a yearly event, not just to celebrate banned and challenged books and the freedom to read, but to draw attention to the fact that, yes, this is still happening. Here. In the US. In your state. In our schools and libraries and sometimes our legislatures. Read More…

10 Favorite Banned Children’s Books

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boundandgaggedbooks:

One parent’s take on Banned Books Week, reasons for challenging children’s classics, and what to do if you find yourself disapproving of something in a book your child is reading.

Originally posted on Amélie's Bookshelf:

This week is banned books week- September 21st through the 27th. It is definitely not a week to celebrate. But it’s a week to acknowledge the disservice that is still done in 2014, in this country. When a book is “banned,” it’s not banned across the board and pulled from every shelf of every bookstore or library. The American Library Association puts out a list of books that have been challenged or pulled from various public libraries across the country, and a substantial amount of those books are children’s books being removed from school libraries. This happens when some overreaching parent decides that the material is offensive for whatever reason, and not only do they not want their own child to be exposed to it, but they feel confident that they know what’s best for other people’s children as well.

Books like And Tango Made Three, the true story of two…

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Batgirls, Boy Wonders, and Beyond: A Parent’s Saga

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Though often thought of as the domain of kids, many comics these days are written and marketed to adults. As I’ve said before on the blog, assuming a genre or medium is automatically kid-friendly or mindless fluff is where many parents go wrong. It’s also how many things that expect a level of maturity of their young readers, or were never intended for young readers to begin with, get banned. Or how you end up like that mom who accidentally bought her son a pornographic pop-up book because she assumed Game of Thrones was like Narnia.

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BANNED BOOKS WEEK: GRAPHIC CONTENT

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Today marks the first day of Banned Books Week, an annual event meant to draw attention to book challenges/removals/bans and other censorship or intellectual freedom issues. This year the event, which runs from September 21-27, will focus specifically on comic books/graphic novels. I’ve already written extensively about the unique history and issues involved in comic book censorship on this blog, so I thought I’d offer a round-up of the highlights, as well as Banned Books Week resources and ideas on how you can get involved. It’s also frequently challenged horror author Stephen King’s birthday today, so let’s hear it for banned horror, banned comics, and the twice-damned banned horror comics! Long may ye remain in our libraries. Read More…

The Road to District 13

Every trailer for Mockingjay just makes me feel that much more certain that they will do the book justice. I can’t wait. Stay tuned for a review of the book in the coming weeks and let me know what you think of the trailer in the comments.

Retro-Review: Magneto – Testament

boundandgaggedbooks:

Nightwing17 recently reviewed the amazingly historical, tangentially superhero-related X-Men graphic novel Magneto: Testament. I absolutely loved this book and think it should required reading in schools as it is both incredibly powerful and surprisingly educational. Despite taking numerous history classes, elective and otherwise, this was the first time I ever heard that 10 million people died in the Holocaust, not 6 million, as every teacher I’ve ever had has mistakenly taught me. Anyway, check out the review and consider giving the book a read (although be prepared for crippling feels).

Originally posted on Reviews by Lantern's Light:

Our culture fetishizes moral ambiguity.

As much as it’s become a dead horse trope, our storytelling conventions still rely on a black and white framework. Too often, like adolescents testing limits, we obsess over the ways we can complicate this simple dichotomy of good and evil. An entire age of comics was defined by our love affair with violent anti-heroes, ‘good’ characters who engage in ‘evil’ behavior.

Nonetheless, it’s rare that we latch on to a character who truly inhabits a moral shade of gray, rather than some attractive paradoxical commingling of good and evil. Magneto is one of these characters.

Part of what makes Magneto special is the inherent presence of a greater evil in his story. As limitedly as it factors in to some stories, Magneto inherently allows us to grapple with the problem of evil and to sort out our feelings about hatred, intolerance, and genocide.

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